Cognizant Corporation Sweetcore: Huge job Opportunities

Cognizant Corporation Sweetcore Huge job Opportunities

Cognizant Corporation, a US-based IT consulting firm, is set to hire more than 23,000 freshers in India this year. This is more than 35% compared to 2020.

Cognizant Corporation, a US-based IT consulting firm, is set to hire more than 23,000 freshers in India this year. This is more than 35 per cent compared to 2020, said CMD Rajesh Nambiar. He said the company will hire more than 17,000 new graduates by 2020. Internships are also given more priority Nambiar said the company will be one of the largest recruitment agencies in the country for the recruitment of highly talented engineering, science and management students as well as other professionals.

It was revealed last year that 17,000 fresh graduates were recruited through campus recruitments. He said India would be one of the key centers in securing experts. For the first time in the company’s history, there will be large-scale recruitment in January-March this year.

Cognizant Company began as Dun & Bradstreet Software (DBSS), established as Dun & Bradstreet’s in-house technology unit focused on implementing large-scale IT projects for Dun & Bradstreet businesses. In 1996, the company started pursuing customers beyond Dun & Bradstreet.

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In 1996, Dun & Bradstreet spun off several of its subsidiaries including Eriscon, IMS International, Nielsen Media Research, Pilot Software, Strategic Technologies and DBSS, to form a new company called Cognizant Corporation, headquartered in Chennai, India.

Operating as a division of the Cognizant Corporation, the company focused on Y2K-related projects and web development. In 1998, the parent company, Cognizant Corporation, split into two companies: IMS Health and Nielsen Media Research. After this restructuring, Cognizant Corporation Solutions became a public subsidiary of IMS Health.

Kumar Mahadeva decided to reduce the company’s dependence on Y2K projects: by Q1 1999, 26% of company’s revenues came from Y2K projects, compared with 49% in early 1998. Believing that the $16.6 billion enterprise resource planning software market was saturated, Kumar Mahadeva decided to refrain from large-scale ERP implementation projects.

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